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Thoughts on Absa’s rebrand

Thoughts on Absa’s rebrand

Sometime mid-June, I was working with colleagues on a presentation that was going to Absa and we were confused about whether to use the Barclay’s blue or the Absa red as the basis for the document. After a bit of research, I found out Absa was actually going to be relaunching a brand-new look in July. I was intrigued to see what the unveiling would be, and yesterday, it was officially launched.

My first encounter with the new brand was seeing a tweet from Absa in the morning, I tapped the profile picture and saw the new red logo on white background. My knee jerk impression was ‘hmmmm, this quite the departure from the previous look’. It looks weird, looks a bit amateurish, slightly clumsy, but different and friendlier, a bit more accessible.

Brand unveilings never go off without a hitch, and true to form, I saw quite a few people ripping it to shreds on social media. Some people said it looked like a WhatsApp status. Others said it looked lazy or like no time was spent on it. The vitriol in some of those comments were…well this is the internet.

But first impressions are not always correct, and certainly the shock of change is real and takes time to wear off while we get used to it. So, after more exploration and inspection of the rest of the brand and its application, and watching the Absa/Intel drone show, and updating my banking app…I like it. I like it a lot.

Let me explain why.

To appreciate a rebrand, you have to understand its context. What happened before? Why the need for this change? To evaluate a rebrand, you have to understand the intent and what they are trying to achieve now. Does the execution do justice to the intention?

Absa’s Past

I thought Absa was a very old brand, but the company is only about 27 years old, with the previous iteration of the brand about 20 years old. Introduced in 1998, Absa had this this very straightforward, corporate, blue chip vibe. Absa was a conservative brand, like the old uncle. Not uncool, just serious and down to business. Everything you would expect from a banking brand in the past era.

Such a brand essence feels dated in today’s climate of technology and the internet. We are getting used to brands becoming more human, more sympathetic and friendlier. Brands are understanding that they can’t just talk down to their customers form on high. They have to stand shoulder to shoulder with them.

The present banking space is dominated by the main 5 – FNB, ABSA, Standard Bank, Nedbank and Capitec. As far as innovation and brand excitement go, FNB has been leading the pack for a while. Unveiling exciting new campaigns, products and ways to bank. Capitec has delighted its customers with great features, fees and benefits. Standard Bank does a lot of brand activation activities and events, but nothing readily comes to mind around its actual products or services so the brand still feels a bit stagnant. Nedbank…I don’t know much about Nedbank, except that they have a deep green hue and seem more focused on corporate investment banking and wealth management.

(Disclaimer: I have been with Absa for over a decade and so I have interfaced with that brand the most. I put together this piece rather quickly so I haven’t done an exhaustive comparative on all the players in the space. These are my just thoughts and impressions off the cuff)

 

 

Sometime in 2015 or so, there were rumours floating that Absa was going to rebrand to Barclays Africa, and it was going to trade as that. Some rebranding efforts went underway, Noticeable in a new website and banking app. However, by last year, Barclays pulled out of Africa recently, reducing their stake in Absa. Absa shifted from a European-owned financial group to become a proudly African firm. For the first time in 15 years, they have the opportunity to chart a new course and offer a new narrative. Where would they go with it?

 

The New Absa Strategy

Absa tackled their rebrand process in an inclusive journey involving over 130 000 employees, clients, customers, consumers and stakeholders, collecting ideas from within as opposed to leaving it solely in the hands of top brass.

So, what is the result of this process? What is Absa’s response to its newly found freedom and this present banking landscape?

To drive growth by going more human.

At the core of the Absa strategy is growth. They want to increase revenue and regain market share, focusing on retail and business banking, corporate and investment banking, rest of Africa, and wealth management and insurance.

 

 

Looking at their strategic outlook, you can see 3 main priorities,

  1. Creating a thriving organization– focusing on culture creation, becoming people-centric, becoming customer centric, and empowering ownership internally
  2. Restoring leadership in core businesses– in retail, becoming the business bank of choice, winning in corporate investment banking, wealth management, etc.
  3. Build pioneering new propositions– superior consumer finance, a leading global payments hub and a winning transaction banking platform

In summary, be more people centric, regain market share, and create new solutions that match the new digital economy and climate.

With this in mind, let us look at the visual branding.

 

The new logo

For a logo to be deemed successful it has to be simple, scalable, memorable, versatile and relevant. In today’s landscape, brand touchpoints range from the big (buildings and billboards) to the tiny (the app icon on your screen). In addition to all of that, logos now also need to be responsive, shape-shifting and adapting to different scales without loss of recognition. I think the new Absa logo does fairly well in reference to those requirements. Although I would argue the previous logo collapsed better to its main icon, the stylised ‘A’.

The logo is circular. I like circular logos. They are balanced and self-contained, and generally iconic. They  work well in the digital/app environment. The broken circle motif is interesting, I’m not entirely sure the exact rationale for that, but it does lend a feeling of movement and is expandable into various brand applications. I think it really comes to life when it is animated. The broken circle in motion is a very digital native sign and speaks to the idea of ‘loading’.

The typeface is what I had the most problem with at first. Looks like a lowercase Ubuntu, with some adjustments, especially with the ‘s’. I’m just not a huge fan, the letters seem a bit bulky and overly rounded. I prefer more crisp, clean modern fonts, but I would imagine this choice does lend it a bit more approachability, a bit more mass appeal than a clinical look and feel. It is a friendly feeling font.

Like I said, the brand launched to cries of ‘lazy!’ And ‘my 5 year old daughter and her dog could have come up with this!’. But the fact that a logo is simple does not mean that the process to get there was simple. It can take hundreds of iterations and options to get to a final logo, and the success of a brand is not just about the logo itself, but how it is applied across all touch points. The new logo might be simple, (which is a good thing for modern brands) but it is also more dynamic with a wider range of application than the old logo, expanding to conversational brackets or even smiley faces.

Also they just launched WhatsApp banking  as well so if you think the logo looks like a WhatsApp status, maybe they just tryna tell you something…

Colours

 

 

Absa maintained the colour red, but a slightly different shade from the previous red they had before. I’m cool with that. There is plenty brand equity in the colour. Red has been synonymous with Absa. Previously chosen for its association with excitement and energy, now it has the added meaning of being an ‘African’ colour – warm tones and all.

ABSA has moved from just the plain red, to a wider range of hues keeping with the African theme and giving the brand more room to express itself. I dig it.

 

 

 

Imagery / Application

The introduction video shows us a glimpse into the visual style of the new brand. It is fun, it is warm, it is exciting, it is colourful, it is vibrant. The feeling of future facing optimism is palpable in the animations, the imagery and the song.

 

Slogans

With the new look, Absa has also moved from its ‘Prosper’ Campaign and now has two slogans.

The first is ‘Africanacity’ which they define as the ‘distinctly African ability to always find ways to get things done’ and the second slogan, ‘Brave. Passionate. Ready’ describes their new-found attitude.

I find the word ‘Africanacity’ a bit clumsy, but I do like the sentiment, and will probably get used to saying it if I just say it like 10 times in a row.

Absa also has a new purpose statement – ‘bringing your possibilities to life’. They want to help you make ‘what is possible real’. As you can see with the ad placement below, Absa is embracing the future, embracing technology with optimism, finding ways to help people get things done despite all odds.

 

In conclusion, I think the rebrand was done well. I like the new logo, I like the new look and feel, and I like the overall strategic direction. But the proof of the pudding is in the eating, let’s see if the Absa experience lives up to the promise of its new brand.

What are your thoughts on the rebrand?

Be patient, it always takes longer than you think.

Be patient, it always takes longer than you think.

If there is one thing I’ve come to see over the years of working and living is that generally, things tend to take longer than you think and certainly longer than you’d like. From small things like the design jobs I work on, to the bigger long-term projects, they can seem to drag on and on, and then life gets in the way and you lose focus.

To remain focused and consistent in the face of a seemingly unending struggle is sometimes a herculean task. But it is one that must be handled if you will succeed. Because that is part of the dip, that long chasm between desire and fulfillment. It is a battle, it is war.

There is a quote I often mention to my friends, that ‘the work belongs to you, but the results belong to God’. It is an admonishment and an exhortation to focus on what you control.

You can’t control when certain things will happen. You can’t control when that deal will come through, or if it will come through. All you can focus on is doing everything that is within your power – preparing, poking holes in your strategy and fixing them, making your case stronger, improving your art, improving your marketing and persuasion. You just have to do all you can, patiently waiting for your turn, ready for the moment Lady Luck smiles on you.

But where does the line fall between being patient and wasting time? It is a tough one for sure. Your being patient with your situation might mean that you are not being proactive enough or doing things that will move the needle forward towards your aims. But sometimes the right and hardest thing to do is nothing. Sometimes all you must do is wait and let the situation resolve itself, let the weather pass, let the opportunity present itself. Other times you must take initiative.

Whatever we choose, whatever the right action to be taken, it is important to remain vigilant. Because if you lose sight of what you are trying to achieve, if you begin to drift, you will soon enough find yourself caught off course and unawares. Be patient but stay vigilant on the goal.

There is the parable in the bible about the bridesmaids and the oil. The entire party is waiting on the groom and he takes forever to arrive. But eventually he does, and when he does, half the party has burned through their oil and can’t light their lamps. The other half were vigilant and better prepared with extra oil and were able to continue with lit lamps into the celebration because they remained goal focused even in the midst of a severely delayed plan.

And that is a form of persistence, not merely of action, but a keen presence of mind.

What do you do when you are blocked? When you are stopped, and all you can do is wait? What do you do when you are forced to take a break? When even though it’s all you want to do, you just can’t move forward yet? Do you give up and lose steam, or do you lean in and use this gift anyway?

Ryan Holiday shares Robert Greene’s distinction between alive time and dead time. The difference between the two is what you do with it.  What do you do with your waiting time? Are you passive, letting your skills atrophy? Do you lose your momentum, or do you find some use for the time you have? Do you keep studying and honing the skills? Do you keep learning? Do you keep preparing, do you stay sharp?

Gary Vaynerchuk has the mantra of ‘Macro Patience, Micro Speed’, it is an incredible encapsulation of a deep-rooted truth, that in the long run, things just take time, that’s why you have to take the wide view, the macro view. But in the day to day, you have to act, you have to hustle, you have to be vigilant. You have to stay hungry and motivated.

That is the dichotomy, the paradox. To make haste, but slowly. To do all you can do today, and this year, but knowing that your dream might take months, or years or decades. In all that, you must play the time, you must keep on working towards the goal. It is a long-term commitment to perpetually being excellent in the short term. It is not easy, but it is necessary if you will get what you want.

Let your moves stack on each other

Let your moves stack on each other

(Or, how to think about strategy)

Trying to get things done and pursuing a long-term goal can be daunting. You are aiming at an eventuality that is still quite far off. You have a sense of where you are going but don’t know quite know how to get there.

You see the mountain top, the main goal you are trying to accomplish, but you are still far off. You have started by doing it badly, but that’s just step one of hundreds of steps to get there.

Is there a way of thinking, a way of acting, that allows the actions we take to build on each other, to gain momentum, and build into a giant snowball racing furiously to our destination?

I think there is, and it’s a combination of strategic thinking and aiming for the domino effect.

Usually people’s efforts are haphazard, they are busy tied up doing a thousand and one things, but none of it is proactive, they are simply reacting to their environment. They end up expending energy in numerous directions, and achieving relatively little, running and running but staying in the same place.

But imagine if you could reduce or at least hone your efforts so they all work together to provide better results faster, building on each other to move you to the new place you desire.

That is the idea of strategy. Of achieving superior results with the same level of activity but just better directed. This is essentialism, this is the one thing, this is make less, work more.

Good strategy takes a look at the facts as they are. What are you really trying to achieve, what are the real problems in your way, what can you tackle and solve, in what order do you tackle them and what cohesive set of actions will you take to get there?

The domino effect is illustrated in the book ‘The One Thing’. Gary talks about lining up your dominoes. Each domino is an action or a mini goal. You place your goals in the right order, knowing what the one thing that would make everything else easier or move you closer towards your goal. You line that one thing up so that doing it will knock down the next thing that would make everything easier or move you closer to your goal. And so on and so forth.

Overtime, domino hits domino, and you build momentum with the energy growing and transferring with each action and toppled target.

For this to work, you need to have a sense of the interconnectedness of things between where you are now and where you are going. And you have to respect the order in which you are doing them. If you tackle the wrong domino, you will have wasted effort and need to double back to fix it.

It is like the designer or client that so eager to jump into the aesthetic design of a product without tackling the domino of strategy – who is it for, what do they need, why should they care. Or the fitness chaser running around in the gym without sorting out her nutrition first. Or worse still, a builder crafting the most gorgeous building without setting a proper foundation first.

You must strive to tackle your dominoes in the right order. In that way, each step you take would improve your odds of success.

When you let your moves stack on each other, each action creates a result that becomes the seed of the next action. So, with my business for instance, taking the time out to clarify a service offering – brand, design, digital – makes it easier for me to communicate and sell services. Taking time to define work processes for each service, makes it easier for me to work and replicate the process with clients. The design process includes me making mockups and prepping the products to look a certain way, which makes it easier down the line to showcase work done on the website, which then act as case studies and feed into content, which then feeds to sales and more work and growth for the company.

In that way, each move is made to make the subsequent moves easier, and the results of each move serve as the beginning of the next move.

To accomplish this, you have to be able to hold a vision of a desired result or situation, and then hazard a guess, a hypothesis of the possible ways forward, and then track a path that will lead you eventually to said goal.

Making your moves stack on each other can be weird territory. When you start, you don’t know anything, you are exploring options and looking for something that resonates, that grips your attention. And then you find it, and you keep working on it, you start to garner some recognition, some attention. Your moves start to give you a position that you can leverage to the next thing.

Sometimes it is easy enough, you can track your path fairly clearly, you have a good enough idea of what is needed, and the conditions are stable. Sometimes it is much harder than that, because the fog is thick, and conditions are constantly changing. You may not be able to identify all the dominoes, but you can work to increase your odds of success.

This is where you have to be woke to what you are trying to achieve and look for opportunities to move closer to that. Sometimes, you need to side step and tackle things obliquely. Sometimes it might even mean slowing down on the thing that has gotten you here, so that you can invest in the thing that will take you there.

But keep this idea in mind, hold a long-term view of your vision, connect the dots backwards and let each action become a stepping stone, and each lesson another arrow in your quiver, your moves will build and propel you to your destiny.

Airplane Mode, the greatest productivity hack

Airplane Mode, the greatest productivity hack

When you absolutely must get things done.

As I’ve mentioned many times before, two books I read in 2016 really changed my approach to life, and my work. They represent two concepts that work together to provide a powerful one – two punch combo that supercharges your ability to get things done.

The first book was “The One Thing” which I have written about. The One Thing offers the idea that only one thing really matters above all. On the macro level, there is the One thing you choose to make your life all about. In the day to day, there is the One Thing you could do that would make other things easier or unnecessary. It’s all about defining your vision and lining up your dominoes and whacking away at the first one until it falls and topples the next one with topples the next one and so on.

The second book is Deep Work by Cal Newport.

Deep work is the ability to focus on a hard task, to really concentrate for a long enough period of time. According to Newport, it is a skill that is becoming increasingly rare in a world filled with easy to access distraction. It is also a skill that is becoming incredibly important and useful in a networked world that needs you to learn skills quickly to thrive, and that allows you to affect millions with just your phone. We are too distracted at our work or at our businesses to give the right amount of effort and focus on the key tasks or projects that would make a definite difference. Doubly so for creatives or knowledge workers who need to expend considerable mental effort to produce good work.

There is a feature of the iPhone (and most other phones I would imagine, I’m hopelessly lost to the Apple hype train) that is irrefutably the best feature of the phone. It is not the above average camera (Samsung kicks its ass in my opinion), it’s not the design and how sleek it looks, it’s not the fact that it makes me look cool when I whip it out. It is the airplane mode function. With a swipe and a tap, I can turn the device from a portal to the infinite distraction machine that is the internet into a shiny paperweight.

Deep Work is the reason my phone is on airplane mode at least 50% of the time. This book is the reason I am many times unreachable, much to the chagrin of my friends and clients (I am so sorry guys but let me explain). It is also the reason I have been able to work on my business and my brand consistently over the past 18 months. It is the reason my design work has gotten stronger, the reason I’m learning faster and the reason my general productivity (the ability to get things done) has doubled or maybe even tripled.

It is also the reason I am less stressed and haven’t tried to hug a kitchen knife.

You see, regardless of how urgent and pressing everything feels, ultimately only a few things really matter. Out of the 100 or so different things you do or get asked to do today, probably none of them actually move you forward in any meaningful way towards a better life or better experience in 5 years. But if we know where we want to go, we can focus on the things that matter and move intentionally towards our BHAGs.

When you combine those two ideas, you are able to focus on what is most important and devote the kind of time and attention that it deserves. It is doing Deep Work on your One Thing.

In the midst of life’s noise, you can take the time to figure out what you want, count the cost, define the key activities and line up the dominoes. Now is the time to cultivate empty space, to block out some time that you can pay attention to the things that really matter. To learn the new skill, to work on the new business idea, to make some art, or simply to give back or build relationships. This is the time for Deep Work.

If I get anything done, and get it done well, or even quickly, my first step is always to switch the phone off. None of that ‘I’ll just put it face down’, that doesn’t work. Psychically I’m still attached, I’m still wondering about who’s trying to get in touch with me. It has to be off, and then finally I feel shut off from the world enough to allow my ideas and creative energy to bubble up to the surface.

Give it a try. If it’s too hard, put your phone in the drawer or the laundry basket or wherever. Just practice being cut off from your phone. See what that does for what you are working on.

When last did you give your full attention to a task? It feels very tempting to multitask. The pleasure of scrolling through our Instagram feeds, or losing hours of time to YouTube is very compelling and addictive. But if you are to get things done, if you are to move steadily to that BHAG, its very useful to learn how to switch off.

Even if it is just to think. From the moment we wake up, notice how we are mentally highjacked by our feeds. My first impulse when I wake up is to check my messages. First Whatsapp, then the Inbox, then Twitter (never Instagram until I’m mentally ready for that kind of mental and emotional assault). And just like that, my day can get highjacked by the needs and demands for others. Live like this enough days in a row and soon you are swept up in a fog of distraction, mediocrity and dissatisfaction. We all need space to think, to connect with ourselves, to heal, to spend some time in reflection or in the quiet pursuit of an interest or a craft.

The ability to go deep, both in your craft, in work and in your life will produce many benefits. It is a required resource in the marathon of pursuing your BHAG and cultivating a happy life. If you can isolate your main thing, and steadily devote time to it, you will stop feeling listless and more focused. And as you get better at it, that momentum of actually doing things will propel you to do some incredible things.

 

Why trying to rush the design process is a mistake every time

Why trying to rush the design process is a mistake every time

This is a slight rant on something I have been experiencing in the past few weeks.

I started out in this design/design business thing self taught. I learned to use the software and I’ve been sloughing away at it ever since. In the 7-8 years I’ve been doing this, I have probably designed up to thousands of pieces and artifacts – logos, mailers, flyers, websites, etc. Over time I have gotten good at delivering visually pleasing work quickly and within the chaotic constraints of the typical client service business.

For most creatives, the most exciting part of our work is the actual creative part, making the thing, the logo or the booklet or the poster. Many times I have fallen into the trap of becoming nothing more than a tool for the client, a pixel pusher. Do this, do that, move that there, without much regard for my opinion or ideas on what works. That was entirely my fault. I did not understand the value I brought to the table nor could I communicate that effectively.

In the chaotic landscape of client services, things tend to be frantic. Everything is always due yesterday. There is often not a good enough understanding of the connection between design output and business objectives. Design becomes a last minute exercise quickly producing pieces of communication without any form of strategy or intent.

This is a mistake.

Sure you can get a nice looking design out of a competent designer working this way. But creating design that actually works, design that clarifies your intentions and aims your efforts, design that sets u up for greater success beyond the project at hand, that is something else entirely. That is the love child of good process and talent.

The Design Method outlined by Eric Karjaluoto in his book goes as follows: Discovery – Planning – Creative – Application. Newbie designers and most clients are happy jumping right into the creative. However they miss out on the many benefits of engaging the first two steps.

Discovery allows you to fully understand the problem at hand, it gives you context. Ideally, the designer should be able to immerse himself/herself into the world of the client and understand how the business works, what the problems are and how the audience interacts with them. Discovery has the benefit of helping the client understand what’s really going on with the business. Are there gaps in the communications? Do you understand what you really do? Do you understand what you are selling? Do you have objectives, and do you know how you are going to achieve them?

Planning helps connect the insights from discovery to the nitty gritty of execution. It provides a plan of action of what needs to be done, targeted to whom and by when. It gives purpose to your efforts and ensures you don’t waste time going down rabbit holes.

Respecting the process transforms a simple brief for a website for a bus company to a holistic communication solution geared at increasing online sales. Instead of just a website, the client is steered towards adopting online marketing, referral campaigns and developing e-commerce solutions. A directive to design new labels for a budding craft beer brand now turns into the task of the defining and refreshing company brand in light of their new investment, offerings and aspirations. Instead of just labels, the brand is rewarded with a deeper understanding of itself and a roadmap for handling communications moving forward.

Rushing through the design process to the production bit might be satisfying in the short term, but you miss out on a ton of value left on the table in the long term.

Understanding context is key to create effective design

Understanding context is key to create effective design

Over the past few years, in my quest to become a better designer, I have been faced with two related ideas – the need for a good process, and consideration of the larger context.

A good process allows me as a designer to work in a way that is systematic. It helps me walk clients through the project from start to finish. I am also able to cover all the important points consistently, and the process allows me to build consequentially. Stage 1 provides a foundation of understanding around the project and goals, the next stage builds a framework to organize execution, and so on, until I get to designing outputs that are firmly rooted in insights and strategy.

As a designer, every design, every action taken sits within a larger context that will ultimately influence the success or failure of the project. If one jumps directly into design trying to make something cool and aesthetically dope, we end up with nothing more than superficial solutions. To have real impact, the work of the designer starts way before he puts pencil to paper or opens up that blank Photoshop canvas.

You have to ask yourself, ‘what is the client trying to achieve?’ – More sales? Increased awareness? Or are they simply trying to communicate to a specific audience? Considering the intent of the design project increases the chances of designing something appropriate and on target.

Engaging in this exercise can seem very time consuming. All you want to do is jump right in and do the fun stuff. But the step back is crucial. If you can define what the brand you working on is all about, who their audience is, what their key messaging is and their objectives are, you can set out a creative strategy framework that would allow the brand to be deployed beyond the specific output you are presently working on.

As an entrepreneur or business person, you may find yourself in need of a design output – a logo, a profile, a brochure, a website, or a full CI (Corporate Identity). It would do a world of good to clearly define your brand first. Your company or product sits in an ecosystem with multiple competitors, multiple audiences and numerous external forces. It is important to define clearly who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and who should care. It is important to know what is unique about you and the value you bring so you can consistently speak to that and with every subsequent release of communication you can reinforce your brand and build equity over time.

Understanding your brand and intent has the powerful effect of helping to direct your efforts in the day to day running of your business and its development. With a clear sense of who you are and what you do, you know how to focus your operations and work in line with your brand and maximize your returns. You won’t split your energy into pursuing things that seem interesting or opportunistic but are out of brand character. It will help you build a stronger more focused business over time.